Hotels / Travel Guide, TurkeyHotels / Travel Guide, Turkey

Hotels / Travel Guide, TurkeyHotels / Travel Guide, Turkey
Forgot password?

Travel Guide to Izmir

Izmir_Konak_Square
  • Turkey
  • İzmir
  • 11906.85 km²
  • Lira
  • Turkish
  • 5,245,549
    [widgets_on_pages id="Travel Guide To izmir Weather"]

General Information About İzmir

Izmir is the third biggest city in Turkey, with a population of around 2.5 million, the second biggest port after Istanbul, and a good transport hub.

Once the ancient city of Smyrna, it is now a modern, developed, and busy commercial centre, set around a huge bay and surrounded by mountains and was. The broad boulevards, glass-fronted buildings and modern shopping centers are dotted with traditional red-tiled roofs, the 18th century market, and old mosques and churches, although the city has an atmosphere more of Mediterranean Europe than traditional Turkey.

The long attractive palm-fringed promenade, Birince Kordon, which stretches the entire length of the city up to the Alsancak Ferry Terminal, is a popular spot for evening walks, and there are many cafes along the waterfront.

Izmir has a good selection of culture and entertainment, from the Archaeological and Ethnographic Museums to the Izmir State Opera and Ballet and Izmir State Symphony Orchestra, to the many bars and clubs. The cosmopolitan and lively city gets even busier during the International Izmir Festival (mid-June to mid-July) with music and dance, with performances also in nearby Cesme and Ephesus.

Transport

Bus

For most city buses, you must buy your ticket in advance at a special ticket kiosk. Kiosks are found at major bus terminals and transfer points and sometimes attached to shops near bus stops. The fare is normally around ₺2.

Private buses sometimes operate on the same routes as municipal buses; they are usually older, and accept either cash or tickets.

Dolmuses & Minibuses

As well as providing transport within cities and towns, dolmuses (minibuses) run between places; you'll usually use them to travel between small towns and villages. Some dolmuses depart at set times, but they often wait until every seat is taken before leaving. To let the driver know that you want to hop out, say 'inecek var' (someone wants to get out).

Minibuses generally operate on routes that are too long for dolmuses, but not popular enough for full-size buses. They usually have narrow seats with rigid upright backs, which can be uncomfortable on long stretches.

Metro

Several cities have underground metros, including Izmir. These are usually quick and simple to use, although you may have to go through the ticket barriers to find a route map. Most metros require you to buy a jeton (transport token; around ₺2) and insert it into the ticket barrier.

Taxi

As everywhere around the world you can use a taxi in Izmir, but is a resort town, so keep in mind that the cost of a taxi is quite expensive (like in other resort towns of Turkey). In most cases 2 times more expensive than say in Istanbul. All taxis in Turkey are equipped with taximeters but after midnight we recommend to ask driver the cost before the trip as the cost may be higher in comparison to daytime.

Ferry

Maybe the nicest way to travel around Izmir is by ferry. Public ferries are easy, fast inside the coast and gives a nice shot of Izmir. There are services provided from 8 stations. Preferable to every other transportation in nice weather.

Nature and beaches

Izmir, in the southern Aegean region of Turkey, the sunshine city, with 629 km coastline along the Aegean, the sun shines in the perfect brightness and the wind blows in the ideal knot while the sand is in its most comfortable warmth in Izmir and its resort towns. Izmir boasts the deep blue sea with beaches displaying the safety symbol of the blue flag.

The city of Izmir itself does not possess any beaches, however, a short journey to the North, East or South of the city will take you to either hustling tourist resorts or quiet secluded peaceful beaches the choice is yours.

There are lots of beach resort around Izmir. Cesme, Foca, Dikili, Karaburun, Menderes, Selcuk and Seferihisar are some of them. These resort towns are well connected with Izmir, also have some of the most popular blue flagged beaches in the province.

The wide of flora and fauna of Izmir you can see in Izmir Wild Life Park (İzmir Doğal Yaşam Parkı). It established by İzmir Metropolitan Municipality lies on 425,000 sq.mt land in Çiğli Salalı and was opened in November 2008.

65,000 trees were planted in the Wild Life Park and there are observation towers and paths for visitors enabling them to watch the animals in their natural environment. A pond of 8,450 sq.mt. at the entrance of the park provides a nesting place for many kinds of waterfowl such as flamingos, swans, and ducks. Vast netted aerial spaces have been created to allow the wild birds fly easily. The park also hosts a large closed area for tropical animals with air conditioning and special flora. If you are bothered by heat and humidity we suggest you do not visit this section. There are 1,500 free-roaming animals representing 120 species including elephants, reptiles, predators and monkeys.

Grounds with stables and coops, plus a manage where children can ride horses, are also among the facilities of the park. The animals are not kept in cages; instead they roam around in their natural environment separated from the visitors with barriers such as water and ditches.

Municipality buses numbered 777 take nature lovers from Karşıyaka- Bostanlı Pier to the Park; car parking lot at the entrance is free of charge.

Weather

Izmir is characterized by long, hot summers and mild, rainy winters. The total precipitation for Izmir averages 706 mm (27.8 inches) per year; however, 77% of that falls during November through March.

The average maximum temperatures during the winter months vary between 12 and 14 °C. in mostly winters are windy and rainy, however, snowfall is some sort of curiousness in these latitudes, which happens once or at most twice a decade, if at all.

The summer months — June through September — bring average daytime temperatures of 30 °C or higher.

izmir-cyclist-tour

Sports Played in İzmir

Basketball is popular in Izmir and numerous events relating to the sport are also commonly enjoyed by visitors

About Sports

Izmir is a home for the annual arts and music events and, In addition, a number of international sports events, most of which also take place in the summer. The season is kicked off in July when Izmir hosts an international fencing championship. It continues all season long with events at the local university including the International University Sports Games which happen in August. Basketball is popular in Izmir and numerous events relating to the sport are also commonly enjoyed by visitors.

It's a bit strange Izmir as the city is related with the sun rather than snow, or with summer rather than winter. However, if you are in Izmir between December and March and if you are really desperate to go skiing, there is a place, actually a mountain 130 km away from the center of Izmir: Bozdag.

Popular GYM in Izmir

Mekan İsmi 1
Mekan Adresi Yazılacak. Tel. : +90 252 417 02 01
Mekan İsmi 2
Mekan Adresi Yazılacak. Tel. : +90 252 000 0000
 
Mekan ismi
Mekan Adresi Yazılacak. Tel. : +90 252 000 0000
 
Mekan ismi
Mekan Adresi Yazılacak. Tel. : +90 252 000 0000
 
Mekan ismi
Mekan Adresi Yazılacak. Tel. : +90 252 000 0000
 
Mekan ismi
Mekan Adresi Yazılacak. Tel. : +90 252 000 0000
 
Mekan ismi
Mekan Adresi Yazılacak. Tel. : +90 252 000 0000
 
Mekan ismi
Mekan Adresi Yazılacak. Tel. : +90 252 000 0000
 
Mekan ismi
Mekan Adresi Yazılacak. Tel. : +90 252 000 0000
 
Mekan ismi
Mekan Adresi Yazılacak. Tel. : +90 252 000 0000
 
Mekan ismi
Mekan Adresi Yazılacak. Tel. : +90 252 000 0000
 
Mekan ismi
Mekan Adresi Yazılacak. Tel. : +90 252 000 0000
izmir culture

İzmir Culture and History

imageframe-image

History

The history of Izmir stretches back to around 3000 BC when the Trojans founded the city in Tepekule in the northern suburb of Bayrakli. This was the birthplace of Homer, who was thought to have lived here around the 8th century BC. The Aeolians, the first settlers, were eventually taken over by the Ionians, and then the Lydians destroyed the city around 600BC before a brief recovery following Alexander the Great's arrival in 334 BC.

After his death, Alexander's generals followed his wishes and re-established Smyrna on Mount Pagos in Kadifekale, and the city then prospered under the Romans. It was destroyed by an earthquake in 178 AD but later reconstructed and became a major commercial port. After the Byzantines, the city had a turbulent time under the Arabs, Seljuks, Crusaders and Mongols, until Mehmet I incorporated it into the Ottoman Empire in 1415. Under Suleiman the Magnificent, Smyrna became a thriving and sophisticated city and a huge trading centre, despite its frequent earthquakes. It was cosmopolitan, with Greek Orthodox, Jews and Muslims, and many languages were spoken amongst locals and visiting traders.

Following the defeat of the Ottoman Empire in World War I, large parts of Anatolia were carved up with the Treaty of Sévres. On 15 May 1919 the Greek Army occupied Izmir and on 9 September 1922 the Turkish Army under the commandment of Mustafa Kemal Atatürk, retook the possession of Izmir.

Historical city center

Izmir is a city with a rich history and lots of historical sights, we advise you to visit some of them for enjoying the atmosphere of the old Smyrna.

On Kadifekale (Mt. Pagos) stands the impressive ruins of a castle and its walls which were built by Lysimachus in the reign of Alexander the Great, and which still dominate Izmir today. The castle offers an excellent vantage point to enjoy a magnificent view of the Gulf of Izmir.

The Agora, or marketplace, in the Namazgah Quarter was originally constructed during the rule of Alexander the Great. What remains today, however, dates from the rebuilding under Marcus Aurelius after a devastating earthquake in 178 A.D.

The Sirinyer and Yesildere Aqueducts, two examples of Roman engineering spanning the Meles River, supplied Izmir's water throughout the Byzantine and Ottoman eras.

The Saint Polycarp Church is the oldest church in Izmir and symbolizes the Seven Churches of the Apocalypse. Saint Polycarp was martyred at age 86 in A.D. 155 at Kadifkale by the Romans. According to tradition, when they tried to burn him at the stake the flames wouldn't touch him so they finally stabbed him to death. The church was reconstructed in 1620.

The symbol of Izmir, the Saat Kulesi, or Clock Tower, stands in the heart of the city at Konak Square. It was a gift from Sultan Abdulhamid and was built in 1901 in an elaborately decorated late Ottoman style.

A visit to Izmir cannot be complete without spending a few hours wandering round the Market Area of Kemer Alti. This is a bustling Bazaar where literally anything can be purchased. It is a confusing warren of small allies, dead ends, connecting squares, shopping centers, offices, workshops, cinemas, Mosques and just about anything else you can think of, there is even a renovated Karavan Sarai hidden in there.

imageframe-image
imageframe-image

Local tastes and cuisine

İzmir's cuisine has largely been affected by its multicultural history, hence the large variety of food originating from the Aegean and Mediterranean regions. Population movement from Eastern and South East Anatolia regions has enriched the local cuisine. Another factor is the large and fertile area of land surrounding the region which grows a rich selection of vegetables. There is a considerable culinary usage of green leaf vegetables and wild plants amongst the residents, especially those with insular heritage, such as the immigrants from Crete. Some of the common dishes found here are the tarhana soup (made from dried yoghurt and tomatoes), "İzmir" köfte, sulu köfte(meatballs), keşkek (boiled wheat with meat), zerde (sweetened rice with saffron) and mücver (made from zucchini and eggs). A Sephardic contribution to the Turkish cuisine, boyoz and lokma are pastries associated with İzmir. Kumru is a special kind of sandwich that is associated particularly with the Çeşme district and features cheese and tomato in its basics, with sucuk also added sometimes
nightlife

İzmir Nightlife

As the sun goes down on another day, the city moves to a different beat as the city comes alive to the sounds of the tuba. Most of the hotspots are to be found around the Alsancak and Konak areas. If you’ve still got the energy after a day's shopping and a night spent wining and dining and you’re looking for somewhere to get on down, then Izmir will not disappoint. You can find many modern Disco's and Night Clubs around all running into the early morning.

Popular Restaurants & Bars in İzmir

 

Palace name 1

Mekanın Adresi buraya yazılacak Tel. : +90 000 123 4567
 
Mekan ismi
Mekanın Adresi buraya yazılacak Tel. : +90 000 123 4567
 
Mekan ismi
Mekanın Adresi buraya yazılacak Tel. : +90 000 123 4567
 
Mekan ismi
Mekanın Adresi buraya yazılacak Tel. : +90 000 123 4567

Famous Clubs in İzmir

 

Palace name1

Mekanın Adresi buraya yazılacak Tel. : +90 000 123 4567
 
Mekan ismi
Mekanın Adresi buraya yazılacak Tel. : +90 000 123 4567
 
Mekan ismi
Mekanın Adresi buraya yazılacak Tel. : +90 000 123 4567
 
Mekan ismi
Mekanın Adresi buraya yazılacak Tel. : +90 000 123 4567

Sort results by:

kalif-hotel-genel2

Hotel Kalif, Ayvalık
Balıkesir Airport

0 reviews

Located in the popular North Agean seaside resort of Ayvalik, the Kalif Hotel is a 3-star hotel offering comfortable accommodations

avg/night0,00€ SELECT

Sort results by:

Izmir_Konak_Square 1% Discount

İzmir City Tour 20 Nov 2015 - 30 Jul 2016

per person1,00€
  • City Tour In 3 Hours
  • Night Street Life in Downtown
  • Enjoy World Famous Restaurant
  • Wine Tester Trips